Category Archives: Research

Explore eLibrary

Database Spotlight

Database Spotlight

Database Spotlight

Have you checked out ProQuest’s eLibrary yet? eLibrary delivers one of the largest general reference collections of periodical and digital media content designed to support a range of users, including dual credit students, college students, and professional educators. eLibrary’s updated interface and features make research easy. Students and Faculty will find the answers they need from more than 2,090 full-text magazines, newspapers, books, and transcript titles, plus a collection of over 7 million maps, pictures, weblinks, and audio/video files.

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eLibrary helps simplify the research process and empowers novice researchers to more easily and efficiently choose their research topic and find authoritative information to support their research claim. It delivers one of the largest collections of periodical and digital media content editorially selected to support novice researchers. Presented on the award-winning ProQuest platform, eLibrary offers two methods of access: a custom Guided Research application, and as part of the unified platform, assuring fit-for-purpose use. The responsively-designed user interface offers access on any device at any time. and, users can cross-search eLibrary with other ProQuest databases!

How can you use eLibrary?

  • Editors’ Picks and Trending Topics help you explore and get started with research
  • Intuitive user interface
  • Media-rich content
  • Cross-search other ProQuest resources
  • Easily export citations
  • Support all users with Lexile reading levels, text-to-speech, language translation

You can access eLibrary from this blog post or from our Databases page.

Contributed by Library Specialist William Heinrich.

Database Spotlight

Explore EBSCO’s LearningExpress Library

Database Spotlight

Database Spotlight

Need to prepare for an occupational board exam, including NCLEX or TExES? Check out the practice exams in the LearningExpress Library database. New Users must create an account for the site in order to save their work, store score reports, and revisit any practice tests, tutorials, or eBooks. Registration only requires a valid email address and a password. This resource offers many other practice tests — explore!

How can you use LearningExpress?

  • Easy to follow video tutorials
  • Practice tests are based on real exams
  • Responsive design for use on desktop computers and mobile devices
  • Take practice exams either at your own pace or timed
  • Unlimited downloads for eBook content
  • Exams are accessible to all users, regardless of disability status.
LearningExpress Homepage

You can access LearningExpress from this blog post or from our Databases page.
Contributed by Librarian, Maureen Mitchell.

Opposing Viewpoints in Context from Gale

Controversial Issues

Need to write a paper on a Controversial topic? These controversial topic databases* will help.

 

Gale Database picture

Check out our newest database*, Opposing View Points in Context. This database provides many types of sources including: academic journals, magazines, news, videos, images, and more.

 

 

 

The database*, eLibrary Curriculum, has both Controversial Issues and Environmental Issues that can be researched.

 

 

Find additional materials in:

 

* Please note: to access databases off campus, you will need to enter your username and password.

Contributed by Librarian, Maureen Mitchell

Controversial Topics

Need to write a paper on a controversial topic? Check out the database, eLibrary Curriculum’s controversial issues or environmental issues resources. *

eLibrary Curriculum database

Find additional materials in CQResearcher, Issues & Controversies, Points of View, NewBank (below Suggested Topics, see Social Issues link), and the library’s book series Opposing viewpoints.

* Please note: to access databases off campus, you will need to enter your username and password.

Contributed by Librarian, Maureen Mitchell

Need Help Citing Your Sources?

Need help citing your sources? Check out the library’s research/subject guide, Writing & Citing Sources. Once on the guide’s home page shown below, more details with citation examples can be located by clicking on the tabs: MLA Citation Style, APA Citation Style, and Chicago Citation Style.

Also, consider coming in person for one-on-one help at the Research/Reference desk or the Writing Center found on the first floor of the library.

Contributed by Librarian, Maureen Mitchell.

 

“False, Misleading, Clickbait-y, and Satirical “News” Sources”

When searching for information online, it can sometimes be challenging to identify reputable resources. There are many websites that might appear legitimate, but they might actually post fake or misleading information alongside accurate information. What steps can be taken to help sort through potentially misleading information?

table

*Note – Numbers represent categories explained in the full document linked below.

Melissa Zimdars, an assistant professor of communication at Merrimack College in Massachusetts, put together a publicly available Google Document cataloging “False, misleading, clickbait-y and satirical ‘news’ sources.”  The document offers up sites that are known aggregators – they take news stories from other sources and rewrite them with more inflammatory headlines and without contextual facts. The document also lists some tips for analyzing news sources, and for how people can identify potentially fake news. Things like strange domain names, unusual domain extensions, and using ALL CAPS should be warning signs.

 

To see the document in full, please follow this link: False, misleading, clickbait-y and satirical ‘news’ sources

Contributed by Library Specialist, William Heinrich